Is This Really Free?

The first article provokes thought on the internet and how it’s funded. It got me thinking about my own newsletter and website and if I’m really offering it up for free. It is free in a monetary sense, but I am asking for my reader’s attention and support (through the affiliate programs).

What I’ve Read:

The Internet’s Original Sin | The Atlantic – Ethan Zuckerman, the first staff member of Tripod.com, reveals the cost of a “free” and open Internet. He uses witty writing and insider knowledge to provide an engrossing dive into the history of the world wide web. It’s hard to imagine paying money for something that I’ve always accessed for free. However, as Zuckerman points out, is it better than giving up my privacy?

My Long Trek Through Nepal, to Deliver a Stiff Drink | New York Times – This reporter brings the earthquake in Nepal to a micro, human to human, level. She shares a personal story while invoking images of the ruin and devastation in Nepal. The nanny’s mother, Japa Tamang, reminds me of my grandmother, strong and stubborn to a fault. I wonder if I would have the grit to stick it out in my hometown in the aftermath of a major disaster.

What I’ve Watched:

ESPN 30 For 30: Sole Man (120 minutes) – This intriguing documentary from ESPN features Sonny Vaccaro, the king maker of basketball shoes. It follows him as he signs the biggest names in basketball, Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, and almost Lebron James to multimillion dollar shoe deals. Sonny is also partly responsible for the money making machine that is NCAA basketball. The documentary catches up with Sonny as he tries to right the wrongs of his early years; he believes that student-athletes are being taken advantage of and should be compensated fairly for their efforts. For a cliff notes version of the issue, watch John Oliver’s take on it.

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