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Thoughts

Locus of Control

control
“Control” by Leon Chan

This past week, I went out to the job site for one of my projects to observe ongoing construction. During the walkthrough of the site, I noticed several areas that were in conflict with the design documents. I informed the contractor of these issues and engaged in conversations on finding a resolution. When I was back at the office filing my field report, I felt incredibly guilty for commenting on what I observed and pointing out the errors on site. It’s strange to feel that way because I was not the one at fault; my company and I did our jobs by designing structures that met the current building code. We were not the ones who missed putting in a connection or used the wrong sized member. Yet I was feeling like the onus was on me to find a solution to the mishaps.

After decompressing and taking a few breaths, I realized that I shouldn’t worry too much about the construction problems. Those issues were outside my locus of control. This psychological phrase describes the extent to which events are within one’s control. So applying it to my current situation, I can’t control the errors in construction or the pressure put on me to find a solution. What I can control are the original designs and my response to the pressure. So now I choose to exercise that control and not let the pressure get to me.

With that rant out of the way, enjoy this week’s reads.

What I’ve Read:

The Ultimate Guide to Habits | Ramit Sethi – This six part guide contains information from various sources about forming and keeping habits. I’ve come across the material featured in this guide before but it’s nice to have everything in one place. With the help of this guide, I started a new habit of writing at least one sentence everyday. I currently have a chain of 5 days and hope to build on it.

The new mind control | aeon – The point of this essay seems especially important now as we move ever closer to November and the US presidential election. It’s quite scary to think about how Google, Facebook, and other internet services could be manipulating the decisions of millions of people. What’s even more terrifying is that it can do so without those people knowing. This essay uncovers a new form of mind control.